Feminism in Theology and Culture

Feminism in Theology and Culture

JPI 950
3 Credits

With an eye to the “New Feminism” of John Paul II, this course examines the key elements of contemporary feminism in what has come to be its two main radical manifestations (“equality feminism” and “difference feminism”): its critique of patriarchy, its central concern about women and work, its appeal to “experience” as norm, and its understanding of gender as either a social construct or an essential (post-modern) difference. The course will, moreover, consider these elements at work in the feminist critique and re-formulation (if not rejection) of the main theological loci (Trinity, Christology, Ecclesiology, Mariology). Students will become familiar with the key figures in and the essential features of feminism (theological and otherwise).

Key texts representing feminist thought (e.g. Beauvoir, Irigaray, Butler), its theoretical background (e.g. Mill, Hegel, Foucault), its theological manifestation (e.g. Johnson, Hampson, Schüssler-Fiorenza, Coakley) as well as its critique (John Paul II, Ong, Stern, Hans Urs von Balthasar) will be read.

Selected Texts

Faculty

Margaret Harper McCarthy

Margaret Harper McCarthy

Associate Professor of Theological Anthropology

Dr. McCarthy’s teaching and writing focuses on various themes belonging to theological anthropology relative to the question of sexual difference (the imago Dei, equality, experience, feminism, the nature of love), but also relative to the nature-grace question (Christocentrism, predestination, the relation between the church and the world).

Learn More
This is default text for notification bar